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Probable Mumps Cases Include 5 From Howell, Farmingdale

A total of 22 likely mumps cases have been reported; 21 of them had contact with D'Jais bar, health officials said

By Keith Brown, keith.brown@patch.com

The probable outbreak of mumps has increased to 22 cases including at least four in Howell and one in Farmingdale. The majority of those affected are tied to D'Jais bar in Belmar, county health officials said Thursday.

The Monmouth County Health Department said that 15 additional cases of probable mumps have been reported, bringing the number to 22 cases that the department is investigating.

Of those cases, the overwhelming majority -- 21 cases -- either work or attended the popular beachfront bar in recent weeks. One of those afflicted is a pre-schooler, according to a county health department release.

Of those exhibiting signs of mumps about are from Monmouth County, with the other half living outside the county, including one from Florida, the department said.

“Since yesterday, an additional 15 individuals with mumps-like symptoms have come forward,” Michael Meddis, county public health coordinator, said in a release. “The medical professionals advised these individuals to be on bed rest, increase their fluid intake and take steps to reduce their fever.”

People reporting mumps-like symptoms living in the county are from Asbury Park, Belmar, Farmingdale, four people from Howell, Keyport, three from Long Branch, Neptune City, Tinton Falls and Wall Township, the department said.

Mumps symptoms have been reported in people living in Woodbridge, Saddle Brooke, Ogdensburg, Emerson, Lawrenceville, Port Saint Lucie, Florida and two from Point Pleasant.

Meddis said in the release that the investigation is continuing as new cases are presented and to determine the source of transmission and identify close personal contacts.

People who were vaccinated with the MMR -- measles, mumps and rubella -- vaccine, as an infant and again between the ages of 4 and 6, are 90 percent less likely to contract mumps, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Symptoms of the infection include swelling of salivary glands, fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness and loss of appetite. Mumps is spread through saliva or mucus from the mouth, nose, or throat of an infected person, according to the release.

The measles, mumps and rubella vaccine given at infancy and again between 4 and 6 years old renders a person 90 percent less likely to contract mumps, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Most mumps transmission likely occurs before the salivary glands begin to swell and within the 5 days after the swelling begins. Therefore, CDC recommends isolating mumps patients for 5 days after their glands begin to swell, the release says.

Anyone with such symptoms should contact their health care professional immediately.

More information about mumps is available from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website at http://www.cdc.gov/mumps/index.html.


Lucretia B September 08, 2013 at 08:19 AM
One of those afflicted is a pre-schooler, according to a county health department release. quote. Quote was taken in the upper portion of the article.
Lucretia B September 08, 2013 at 08:29 AM
Now, Mic Kie......Perhaps I should have identified my specific interest in these cases. That being the passive attitude that some people have about their health. When a person is showing symptoms of mumps or the flu, they know they are sick. I think obviously, the normal person will go to the doctor in order to feel better or will take their child who is suffering from an illness to a doctor to get that child better. But in these cases above, we are dealing with adults who haven't done anything but spread the disease to other people and a preschooler who is being made to suffer. The passive attitude tells the responsible people to do nothing but spread the disease. Like I said before, when you take this kind of irresponsible attitude, our children are at risk next. No, MicKie, I am not spreading false information.
Deleted September 08, 2013 at 04:07 PM
A preschooler affected does not mean he/she was the initial carrier. I've never had chicken pox, measles, nor some other childhood diseases. It could be an adult. My point is, until we know...don't assume. And it's the Mumps (supposedly), no Eboli, they're in discomfort, not suffering. Gees, what an alarmist. I've never had the MMR shot; it simply wasn't available. If you and your children have, then you're at minimal risk according to the CDC, you're basically safe. As for parents/guardian keep sick children home or taking them to the doctor, some people have no health coverage, or if working, are too afraid to lose their jobs if they take time from work. It is sometimes a moral dilemma when a decision has to be made to send your child to school so that you don't lose your job. If this country provided adequate healthcare, job security and time off w/o the threat of losing your job, the decisions would be easier. I've spent enough time in emergency rooms at 3:00am only to go to work a few hours later. It's not about a passive attitude, sometimes it more about the roof over your head and eating. But that's a discussion for another day.
Lucretia B September 08, 2013 at 05:17 PM
How can you say Im an alarmist, Mic Kie, when there are already 22 cases of this disease in the county? Its here. Its now. And its probably going to get worse before it gets better and finally goes away. Quote from Mic Kie: As for parents/guardian keep sick children home or taking them to the doctor, some people have no health coverage, or if working, are too afraid to lose their jobs if they take time from work. It is sometimes a moral dilemma when a decision has to be made to send your child to school so that you don't lose your job. If this country provided adequate healthcare, job security and time off w/o the threat of losing your job, the decisions would be easier. End quote. Mic Kie, Ive known quite a few people who sent their kids to school when they were sick....basicially, these kids had simple colds and things like that. I don't feel like the parents should feel guilty in this case. But now youre talking about a disease which has a lot of serious symptoms. How can a woman send this child off to school with serious symptoms? As for being afraid that he or she would lose their job if they asked for time off to take their kid to the doctor....MicKie, where theres a will theres a way. Theres weekends and evenings. Even someone's lunch hour can afford them just enough time to drive their child to a clinic. I just don't buy the passive excuse.
Lucretia B September 08, 2013 at 09:05 PM
Let me make a P.S. here.....if one has a decent and respectful relationship with their boss and a relationship where the parent never takes advantage of the employer when it comes to their kids then Im sure that boss will be understanding whenever he needs to be. Its not hard to understand that we are all human with responsibilities.

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